CPSA Europe 2020

Meeting Programme

Updated 24 January, 2020

Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday

Tuesday February 4

8:00 am - 11:00 am

Wimpole Hall
Cambridgeshire, UK

CPSA 5K WALK Charity Event

Organizer: Neil Spooner, Spooner Bioanalytical Solutions

Where Technology and Relationships Meet the Road!

Join friends and colleagues in the 1st Annual CPSA 5K Charity Event at CPSA Europe. Have a great time, meet new friends. It's a walk in the park and all for a great cause!

Join the Walk

12:00 pm

Lobby

Registration

Front Lobby

1:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Pre-Conference Workshops

Queen's Room

WORKSHOP 1
The Future of Personalised Healthcare:
Integrated Solutions

Workshop Leader: Emily Ehrenfeld, New Objective

This years workshop will build upon the previous two pre-conference workshops (see the notes from last years pre-conference workshop) and programmes at CPSA Europe and will explore how we generate and utilize quantitative data for human healthcare and wellbeing. Established workflows for the generation of quantitative analytical data used for decision making by clinicians, pharmaceutical companies, central clinical laboratories and academics have remained essentially unchanged for decades. This approach has suited the established means of one size fits all approach to delivering healthcare. However, this approach is no longer ideal, or indeed sustainable. Personalized medicines and treatments are increasingly becoming the norm. Further, technologies are enabling patient sampling and subsequent analysis to be performed in locations and with technologies that are more patient centric and importantly, many subjects are taking a more active interest in their own medical data and the decisions resulting from it. This paradigm shift calls for a change from the established workflows. This workshop will explore these changes, their implications and what a new normal might look like in 5-10 years time. We welcome you to join our discussion.

Panel Discussion:
Neil Spooner, Spooner Bioanalytical Solutions
Erwin Berthier, Tasso
Ute Gerhard, University of Hertfordshire
Darragh Murnane, University of Hertfordshire
Hitesh Pandya, AstraZeneca
Jenny Royle, digital Experimental Cancer Medicine Team
James Rudge, Neoteryx
and more...

Magdalene Room

WORKSHOP 2
BSSN Software from Merck Innovations.
Vendor Independent Laboratory Informatics making laboratory information accessible globally

Moderator: Jason Wrigley, Merck
Presenter: Peter Maier, Merck

Bring all analytical and biological data into one common format. Aggregate all converted raw data, meta data and results in a highly scalable file store and comprehensive meta data repository. Archive your data with/without the original data set and use meta data information to navigate on your data, without compromise. Review data from different sources even combined in a single viewer, at any time, at any place and one any device. Clean-up, combine and interpret and even process all data completely decoupled from the vendor software. Interface your instruments bidirectionally with your LIMS, ELN or ERP (SAP) to establish full data integrity and compliance.

Join us to gain an overview and insight into this new software. Discuss how we can make this into what you want for your requirements e.g. global sample tracking, raw data interrogation from multiple platforms. This is an opportunity to help shape and mould the software of the future. Join us to be part of the solution.

6:00 PM - 9:00 pm

College Suite

Welcome Reception & IMAGINE SUMMIT

Imagine Summit
Building Tomorrow Today

Welcome
Neil Spooner, Spooner Bioanalytical Solutions and
Emily Ehrenfeld, New Objective

Christophe Stove

Imagineer
Christophe Stove
Ghent University


Interactive Breakout Session - Four Pillars!

  • Portability
  • Facilitators: Kevin Bateman, MSD (Merck & Co. in USA/Canada); Erwin Berthier, Tasso, Inc.
    Scribe: TBC


  • Personalized
  • Facilitators: Matthew Barfield, GlaxoSmithKline; Jenny Royle digital Experimental Cancer Medicine Team
    Scribe: Deanne Rudd, MSD (Merck & Co. in USA/Canada)


  • Performance
  • Facilitator: James Rudge, Neoteryx
    Scribe: Jason Wrigley, Merck (MilliporeSigma in USA/Canada)

  • Productivity
  • Facilitator: John Smeraglia, UCB
    Scribe: Michelle Reid, ETH Zurich

Wednesday February 5

7:00 AM - 8:30 AM

Lobby

Registration

Front Lobby

8:30 AM - 8:45 AM

University Suite

Welcome & Opening Remarks

Mike Lee

Welcome
Mike Lee
Milestone Development Services

Neil Spooner

Format, Objectives, Opening Remarks
Neil Spooner
Spooner Bioanalytical Solutions

Ismael Zamora


Ismael Zamora
Molecular Discovery

8:45 am - 9:30 am

University Suite

Plenary Lecture

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy – Why the Way We Sample Blood Matters
"Mum - why don’t they just punch me in the face?"

Fleur Chandler

Fleur Chandler

Duchenne UK

9:45 am - 11:30 am

University Suite

Session 1
Symposium Session

Pushing the Boundaries of Sample Collection – Near and Small

Discussion Leaders: Emily Ehrenfeld, New Objective; Matt Barfield, GlaxoSmithKline

With such an impactful plenary speaker we didn’t want to jump straight into a series of presentation, so this session is a panel discussion bringing together leading experts with the vision and passion to challenge the status quo. The theme is based on delivering the promise of near patient sampling, overcoming the perceived and real obstacles but most importantly listening and learning from the patient. This session is designed to focus on the patient and sets the theme that will run throughout the meeting and aims to deliver the dream

Panelists:
James Rudge, Neoteryx
Christophe Stove, Ghent University
Erwin Berthier, Tasso, Inc.
Deanne Rudd, MSD (Merck & Co. USA/Canada)
Scott Summerfield, GlaxoSmithKline
Jenny Royle, digital Experimental Cancer Medicine Team
Fleur Chandler, Duchenne UK

11:30 am - 1:00 pm

Parallel Sessions

University Suite

Session 2
Fit-for-Purpose or Fear-for-Purpose: Developing Methods in a Regulated Environment

Discussion Leaders: Deanne Rudd, MSD (Merck & Co. USA/Canada); Ian Dawson, Covance

Is there such a thing as fit-for-purpose bioanalytical methods when it comes to human samples? Should all samples be treated with the same level of rigor? How does this rigor apply to patient-centric sampling and micro sampling? How do current study requirements impact time to market and end user cost? This session will feature a round table that will discuss these topics with the hopes of sharing experiences and getting at why we do what we do, if change is needed, and how to effect a change in a complex organization.

Corpus Christi Room

Session 3
Getting the ‘i’ into Clinical Trials
(To Improve Patient Outcomes and Data Integrity)

Discussion Leaders: Jenny Royle, digital Experimental Cancer Medicine Team; Scott Summerfield, GlaxoSmithKline

Creativity and progress is frequently hampered by people not collaborating across boundaries. This session uses the World Café format to structure a fun and interactive discussion on how to break down these boundaries and speed up deployment of new innovations in trials.

The aim is to focus on problems you have. So, to win the chance of getting the whole conference helping to solve your issue, send your topic now to Jenny Royle for it to be added into the hat.

Hang your coats at the door, roll up your sleeves, and let’s begin…

1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

College Suite

Sponsored Lunch & Roundtable

The Future of Personalised Healthcare:
Integrated Solutions – Mapping a Path Forward for Microsampling and Separations

Discussion Leaders: Matt Barfield, GlaxoSmithKline; Neil Spooner, Spooner Bioanalytical Solutions; Mike Lee, Milestone Development; Emily Ehrenfeld, New Objective

2:45 pm - 4:15 pm

University Suite

Workshop

To Be Announced

Discussion Leaders: Ute Gerhard, University of Hertfordshire; Emre Isin, UCB; Darragh Murnane, University of Hertfordshire

4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Parallel Sessions

University Suite

SESSION 4
What Does a Trial@Home look like?

Discussion Leaders: Jason Wrigley, Merck (MilliporeSigma in USA/Canada); Chris Bailey, AstraZeneca; Sergio Raise, Humber Foundation NHS Trust

During this session, the speakers will highlight the practical and operational challenges of delivering a clinical trial that involves patient sampling in a clinic and/or home setting and discuss what more a scientific function can do to assist colleagues in clinical operations in improving the patient sampling experience.

The Operational Challenges of Obtaining High Quality Samples from a non-Clinic Setting AstraZeneca’s AMBER trial case study
Lynsey Woodford, AstraZeneca

It’s assumed the analytical challenges of assaying samples/microsamples for low levels of therapeutics are the main considerations of implementing a 'trial@home' strategy. However, our experience has shown our ability to develop and validate assays pretty much takes these challenges off the table, primarily leaving us with the more practical and operational challenges of non-clinical site sample collection.

AstraZeneca's AMBER trial involves sampling of adolescents for various endpoints at the clinic and in a home setting and the challenges, lessons learned and those we’re still learning for delivering high quality samples for analysis will be presented and discussed.

What more can scientists do? – changing our mindset to giving the patient the choice
Chris Bailey/Miné de Kock, AstraZeneca

We develop our science to answer questions that expand our knowledge, in the case of clinical pharmacology one question is - how much drug is there? Typically, our assays require µL of matrix but we routinely ask patients to provide us with mL of sample. Additionally, we request multiple samples over a time course, often with little evidence provided by the scientist justifying the numbers requested. Therefore, can we, as scientists, do more to meet a patient’s needs?

In this presentation our findings from a pharmacokinetic bridging study will be shared, specifically how we were able to demonstrate, with the application of appropriate pk modelling techniques, drug concentration data from different blood-derived matrices (collected in different ways), taken on fewer occasions, are interchangeable potentially allowing patients to choose how and where some of their samples are collected during a clinical trial – at the clinic or at home/workplace/school, venous or finger-prick etc.

A GP’s point of view
Sergio Raise, Humber Foundation NHS Trust

The potential practicalities of using a GP surgery, nurse clinic or mobile phlebotomist will be discussed. The patient’s point of view from a GP will also be highlighted including his thoughts on how to increase adherence and reduce drop out rates.

Opening up the discussion to the audience we’d like everyone to consider what might be the ethical, regulatory, operational and other challenges we’d need to overcome to shift the decision-making paradigm more towards the patient with respect to the ‘how and where’ of sampling, rather than this being purely the domain of investigators and sponsors.

Corpus Christi Room

SESSION 5
Imaging Technologies for Applied Clinical Research

Discussion Leaders: David Browne, PRA Health Sciences;  Michelle Reid, ETH Zurich

During this session, the speakers will highlight imaging techniques for patient diagnosis and treatment improvements.

Mass Spectrometry in Medicine
Michael Morris, Waters Corporation

This talk will look at the potential of mass spectrometry (MS) for the support of tissue identification in real-time using direction ionization techniques. With greater acceptance of MS technology, other avenues have opened for the use of MS in routine medical science, including imaging and automated analysis.

Morphological Detection of Cancer Cells by Deep Learning Improves Personalized Drug Testing
Tim Heinemann, ETH Zurich

We trained multiple network architectures to classify cancer cells from label-free imaging channels, either per patient or across all patients, and benchmarked their performance against cancer cell detection by immunofluorescence (IF) against diagnostic markers. Remarkably, treatments recommended by a single convolutional neural network (CNN) trained across all patients clinically outperformed those recommended by IF and all other networks. Through single CNN and IF recommended treatments, image-based drug response can be improved in patient biopsies for personalized medicine.

6:00 pm

University Suite

CPSA EUROPE GROUP PHOTO

Please gather toegther to capture the 3rd Annual CPSA Europe gathering with a group photo—including organizers, speakers, attendees—everyone!

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

College Suite

Sponsored Reception & Dinner

Thursday February 6

7:00 AM - 8:30 AM

Lobby

Registration

Front Lobby

8:30 am - 10:00 am

University Suite

Session 1
Symposium Session

Emerging Technologies to Enable a Paradigm Shift from "Sick Care" to "Health Care"

Discussion Leaders: Pawanbir Singh, Trajan Scientific and Medical; Emre Isin, UCB

The primary goal for pharmaceutical industry is to develop medicines with the right exposure, reach the right target and treat the right patient. However, in the present information rich world, the ultimate objective is not only to control symptoms and treat disease but provision of technologies that facilitate both disease prevention and disease management. The enormity of this objective requires a transformative change. On one hand, there is the need to develop and have access to novel technologies which accelerate the drug development process and on the other, novel tools that enable a prevention model by focusing on forestalling disease development before clinical manifestation.

The objective of this session is to discuss emerging technologies and avenues to facilitate a paradigm shift from "sick care” to “health care"

Patterns of health and disease: Molecular images in cellular context
Ron Heeren, M4I, Maastricht University

Applications of metabolic phenotyping in pre-clinical and clinical safety
Muireann Coen, Imperial College London and AstraZeneca

10:15 am - 11:45 am

University Suite

Session 2
Symposium Session

What can the bioanalytical community learn from other analytical based industries and workflows?

Discussion Leaders: Elizabeth Thomas, Alderley Analytical; Nathan Hawkins, Anatune; Jason Wrigley, Merck (MilliporeSigma in USA/Canada); Neil Spooner, Spooner Bioanalytical Solutions

In the middle of difficultly lies opportunity: The assessment of vitamin status in the clinical setting
Dominic Harrington, Viapath Limited

Automation in Environmental Analysis, the Journey so far
John Quick, ALS (Environmental) Coventry

12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

College Suite

Sponsored Lunch & Roundtable

Let's make something happen and eat more birthday cake!

Sergio Raise, Humber Foundation NHS Trust

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

University Suite

WORKSHOP 1
WORKSHOP

Are Current Clinical Chemistry Tests Still Fit for Purpose?

Discussion Leaders: Amanda Wilson, AstraZeneca;
James Rudge, Neoteryx

Research is showing that specific diseases are much more heterogeneric than we first thought. Thus our growing knowledgebase is allowing Medicine to become increasing personal. The knock on effect is that tests now need to become more specific for each subcategory of a disease in terms of diagnosis and monitoring. With clinical journals burgeoning full of fantastic new assays, which aim to fulfil these increasing needs, we seem to have a problem to overcome. Very few of these new assays are being adopted for routine clinical use. What is the reason for this and how can we find a path to bring forward new assays into the routine lab?

During this session, Professor Brain Keevil (Head of Clinical Biochemistry at Wythenshawe Hospital) will give a short primer on the issues faced with adopting new assays in a busy hospital laboratory. During this he will highlight 3 questions / challenges which will then be discussed by the attendees. The group will split into 3 smaller groups who will tackle one challenge each. Towards the end of the session, each group will summarise their discussion and report to the wider group.

Are Current Clinical Chemistry Tests Still Fit for Purpose?
Brian Keevil, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust

3:15 pm - 4:45 pm

Parallel Sessions

University Suite

SESSION 3
The Bedside Bioanalyst

Discussion Leaders: Ian Wilson, Imperial College (London); John Smeraglia, UCB

Bringing high quality analytical chemistry to the patient in the operating theatre, at their bedside, in the GP's surgery, or their own homes for therapeutic drug monitoring, biomarker analysis, diagnosis and therapy monitoring.

If we have learned nothing from the Theranos scandal its that there is both a need, and an appetite, from individuals for good, accurate and reliable analytical information about health, disease the causes and time-course of disease, and the outcome of therapies.

How can we deliver it?

Cutting through to the patient with SABRE
Simon Duckett, University of York

This talk will focus on showing how SABRE, a method to dramatically improve the detectability of materials by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, is expected to open up new opportunities for the rapid analysis of biofluids. Our aim is to create a hand-held detector capable of rapidly collecting a response that can be linked to health and disease

Will the medical robot have a nose?
Paul Thomas, Loughborough University

The challenge of screening a large number of potential casualties for exposure to a chemical agent, or perhaps radiation injury, was addressed in the European funded research project TOXI-triage. The proposition was to use breath analysis and in 2018 and 2019 two large technical exercises demonstrated the feasibility of rapid on-site triage by breath screening. At the close of this project we know that delivering breath screening is practicable, and that we are waiting for the arrival of validated breath biomarkers. In parallel to the TOXI-triage project the pathology node EMBER was running clinical studies with acutely breathless patients. Ember was funded by the Medical Research Council who commented on the outcomes:

"Breathomics to detect volatile organic compound biomarkers was now an accepted technology that had attracted considerable industry interest

The EMBER investigators were congratulated for having the vision to take what at the beginning had been an innovative technology along the diagnostic path not only in a systematic way but in a comparatively short time

The technology could be applied for screening or diagnosis across a wide range of major health concerns. EMBER had now embedded breathomics in interventional trials funded by Pharma in eg COPD, asthma, cardiovascular disease..."

Perhaps it is still premature to claim that in the future breath analysis will be used routinely in clinical practice. However, the crux in realising this ambition is better defined than has previously been the case, and the research methodologies required for the creation of an appropriate library of breath biomarkers are nearly mature.

The end-goal? Is probably volatile organic compound screening embedded into the patient's bed and integrated algorithmically into their care and management.

Corpus Christi Room

SESSION 4
Social Media and Scientific Publishing in the 21st Century

Discussion Leaders: Laura Dormer, Future Science Group; Shane Needham, Alturas Analytics

There are already many new ways to share information beyond the traditional printed white paper/research article. This session will include discussion between the panel members and audience on how they currently share their information and data, how this might evolve in the future utilizing electronic platforms and social media, and what risks/challenges/opportunities this might present.

Discussion Panelists:
Jenny Royle, digital Experimental Cancer Medicine Team
Michell Reid, ETH Zurich
Jason Wrigley, Merck (MilliporeSigma in USA/Canada)

5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

University Suite

Vendor Session

"Five Minutes of Fame"

Discussion Leaders: Elizabeth Thomas, Alderley Analytical; Neil Spooner, Spooner Bioanalytical Solutions; Mike Lee, Milestone Development Services

Participants are given the opportunity to present their idea, company, products and services to the participants of CPSA Europe 2020 using any format they'd like. The only rule is it is limited to just 5 minutes! Be bold, have fun, get noticed and make a statement.

Patient Centric Sampling – Working across boundaries to get stuff done!
Neil Spooner, Spooner Bioanalytical Solutions

BSSN – AnIML in Action
Jason Wrigley, Merck (MilliporeSigma in USA/Canada)

Bioanalysis without boundaries
John Smeraglia, UCB

To Be Announced
Peter Ketalaar, PRA Health Sciences

Connections
Elizabeth Thomas, Alderley Analytical

Smarter, Simpler, Patient-centric Sampling
James Rudge, Neoteryx

Instrument Top Automation will never work for sample preparation in routine bioanalysis
Tony Taylor, Arch Sciences Group

Capitainer – next generation home sampling solutions
Christopher Aulin, Capitainer

Solutions for Life – Bringing practical analytical technologies to those who need them, how they need them, where they need them and when they need them
Emily Ehrenfeld, New Objective

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

College Suite

Sponsored Evening Event & Dinner

The Future of Personalised Healthcare: Integrated Solutions – Mapping a Path Forward for Sample Preparation and Data

Discussion Leaders: Matt Barfield, GlaxoSmithKline; Neil Spooner, Spooner Bioanalytical Solutions; Mike Lee, Milestone Development; Emily Ehrenfeld, New Objective

Friday February 7

7:00 AM - 8:30 AM

Lobby

Registration

Front Lobby

8:30 am - 10:15 am

Peterhouse Room

Session 1
Symposium Session

The Future of Digital Biomarkers

Discussion Leaders: Kevin Bateman, MSD (Merck & Co. in USA/Canada; James Rudge, Neoteryx; Jenny Royle, digital Experimental Cancer Medicine Team

The Potential of Digital Biomarkers to Transform Drug Development
Marissa Dockendorf, MSD (Merck & Co. in USA/Canada)

Can Remote Blood Testing and Digital Biomarkers Drive Behavioural Change?
Bala Sirigireddy, NHS Clinical Entrepreneur Fellow

Digital Biomarkers – What’s the Point?
Early Clinical Trial Experience
Jenny Royle, digital Experimental Cancer Medicine Team

10:15 am - 12:00 pm

Peterhouse Room

Session 2
Symposium Session

Little by Little:
Mixing Microfluidics and Clinical Microsamples

Discussion Leaders: Christophe Stove, Ghent University; Ute Gerhard, University of Hertfordshire; Darragh Murnane, University of Hertfordshire; Dan Baker, University of Hertfordshire

Developments in silicon nanotechnology for healthcare applications
Tim Stakenborg, IMEC

In this talk, we will introduce how leveraging silicon technology can help to develop miniaturized biomedical devices as a route towards portable, decentralized diagnostics and healthcare. We will describe the potential of this approach in the transfer from innovative research concepts to mass-manufacturable prototypes while retaining advantages such as low reagent consumption, automation and controlled experimental parameters. Examples will be given for a fast and real-time detection of nucleic acids or protein biomarkers using minimal sample volumes. These examples are intended for the audience to get familiar with high-performance, integrated silicon chips and as an invitation for follow-up discussions towards other technological opportunities and application areas.

Diagnostics where you need it
Jan-Willem Hoste, Antelope DX

12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Peterhouse Room

Lunch & Symposium Session

How Does Software Impact Your Scientific Life? It’s Getting Personal!

Discussion Leaders: Ismael Zamora, Molecular Discovery

The capabilities of scientific software, such as those used for metabolite identification, are becoming increasingly sophisticated. This is now coming to the point where these solutions are able to fulfil many of the functions currently performed by skilled scientists, which brings us to an interesting junction….. This discussion based sessions will encourage attendees to reflect on where we might be goings with regards to these solutions. What might be the benefits and risks of their implementation and how should we be moving forwards to enable us to develop better solutions for human wellbeing and the patients that are waiting for better diagnoses and medicines.

1:30 pm

Peterhouse Room

Closing Remarks

Neil Spooner, Spooner Bioanalytical Solutions
Ismael Zamora, Molecular Discovery
Mike Lee, Milestone Development Services